Articles

Supreme Court asked to review Constitutionality of current male-only draft registration requirement

Español / Edward Hasbrouck / Resisters.info - On January 8, 2021 the National Coalition For Men, a men’s rights organization represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Constitutionality — now that women are allowed in all military combat assignments — of the law which requires men but not women to register with the Selective Service System for a possible military draft.

Read below for my FAQ about what this does and doesn’t mean, and what happens next. (Click here for links to the Supreme Court docket, pleadings, press releases, and additional commentary and analysis.)

I’ve been tracking this case up and down through the lower courts since 2015, and I attended the oral argument last year before the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans that led to the ruling that the Supreme Court is now being asked to review.

I’m actually a footnote (note 3, p. 4) to the petition for certiorari filed today with the Supreme Court, which cites my Web site about the draft as the authoritative source of one of the Department of Defense documents I obtained in response to my Freedom Of Information Act requests to the National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service (NCMNPS). Apparently this document isn’t available from the DoD, the NCMNPS (which removed many files from its Web site before it shut down), or any other government source. The NCMNPS summarily and improperly “closed” almost all of my outstanding FOIA requests and appeals just before it disbanded, and designated most of its records to be immediately destroyed. I managed to get all of the NCMNPS records transferred to the National Archives, which is also threatening to destroy most of those records, but has released some additional files.

Webinars: Countering Military Recruiting in Schools During the Pandemic

A webinar series on how to address the challenge of countering military recruitment in schools during the pandemic.

https://nnomy.org/CRduringpandemic/

We are a group of activists representing various organizations that are part of NNOMY (National Network Opposing the Militarization of Youth). We have been meeting to address the challenge of doing counter recruitment work during a pandemic. Based on our discussions we decided to offer a series of workshops to increase our outreach.

Webinars: 1: Remote Learning | 2: Getting into the Classroom | 3: Social Media | 4: Content Creation & Class Project

  ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Groups and individuals that do counter military recruitment during the pandemic

  ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
CR during a pandemic - remote learning platform workshop 12/05/2020 | menu
Sponsored by organizations in the National Network Opposing the Militarization of Youth (nnomy.org).
 
The first one is on remote learning platforms and it is scheduled for Web Conferences & Remote Work |
 
Saturday, December 5 at 12 Noon Pacific, 2 PM Central, 3 PM Eastern.
 
 
 
 
The feedback we received seemed to indicate that Zoom and Google were used the most in the classroom. This workshop will cover Zoom and Google. It will NOT cover the basics of how to use Google and Zoom. That information is available elsewhere (YouTube, Google, etc). Instead we structured the workshop around specific questions people submitted. If you did not forward a question you can ask your question during the workshop.

From Student Debtor to Soldier

How the student loan debt crisis forces low-income students of color into the military.

Dec 14, 2020 / Anna Attie / In These Times - When James Gard­ner got injured play­ing bas­ket­ball as a DePaul Uni­ver­si­ty fresh­man, he lost his finan­cial aid pack­age and was dropped from his class­es. To stay in school, he took out a $10,000 loan.

Soon, Gard­ner (a pseu­do­nym request­ed in fear of reprisal) and his fam­i­ly real­ized they couldn’t afford the uni­ver­si­ty. Instead, he trans­ferred to a pub­lic uni­ver­si­ty out­side Chica­go and enrolled in the Reserve Offi­cer Train­ing Corps (ROTC) of the Air Force. The mil­i­tary paid for his entire col­lege edu­ca­tion — on the con­di­tion he serve at least four years after graduation.

Gard­ner is a mem­ber of the Demo­c­ra­t­ic Social­ists of Amer­i­ca (DSA) and says the mil­i­tary is geared toward ​“resource extrac­tion and resource allo­ca­tion.” When DSA col­leagues learn about his mil­i­tary back­ground, he says there is a ​“lit­tle bit of a gasp.”

“Would I be in the same predica­ment,” he won­ders, ​“if col­lege and uni­ver­si­ty were tuition-free? Would I have gone through ROTC? I don’t know.”

Gardner’s sit­u­a­tion isn’t unique. Amer­i­cans owe more than $1.67 tril­lion (Source: adjusted for 11/2022 now $1.768 trillion) in stu­dent debt, and the cost of col­lege has increased by more than 25% in the past 10 years. Accord­ing to a 2017 poll by the Depart­ment of Defense, pay­ing for edu­ca­tion is the top rea­son young peo­ple con­sid­er enlist­ing. In 2019, the Army cred­it­ed the stu­dent debt cri­sis with help­ing it sur­pass its recruit­ment goals.

Share this

FacebookTwitterStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksRedditLinkedInRSS FeedPinterestInstagramSnapchat

Gonate time or money to demilitarize our public schools

Contact NNOMY

The National Network Opposing
the Militarization of youth (NNOMY)

San Diego Peace Campus
3850 Westgate Place
San Diego
California
92105
U.S.A. 

admin@nnomy.org 

 +1 619 798 8335
Tuesdays & Thursdays 12 Noon till 5pm PST

Skype: nnomy.demilitarization

Search the NNOMY website

Mobile Menu