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Peaceful Career Alternatives is an informational resource for youth with limited life options.

 

Militarization of our Schools

The Pentagon is taking over our poorer public schools.
This is the new reality for our disadvantaged youth.

 

 

What we can do

Corporate/conservative alliances threaten Democracy  .
Progressives have an important role to play.

 

Why does NNOMY matter?

Most are blind or indifferent to the problem.
A few strive to protect our democracy.

  

Before You Enlist (2018)

Straight talk from soldiers, veterans  and their family members tells what is missing  from the sales pitches presented by recruiters  and the military's marketing efforts.

 

Facing falling enlistment numbers, the U.S. Army takes a new approach to recruitment: Mom and Dad

Nicole Goodkind / Fortune - Gone are the days when the United States Army plastered airwaves with recruitment advertisements that includes photographs of younger males parachuting out of Apaches, fording streams, and jogging throughout barren fields over the sober horns of Mark Isham’s “Army Strong.”

Today’s Army is taking a other approach: They’re going after Mom and Dad.

A sequence of new tv recruitment advertisements function moms and fathers in conflict settings, making an attempt to convince their kids no longer to sign up for the Army. 

In one advert, titled “Warfighter,” a mom approaches her son who’s decked out in a ghillie swimsuit and aiming a gun. The mom, who’s dressed in a nightgown and housecoat, implores the younger guy to come again house.

“Michael,” she begs. “You can do anything you want. Why this?”

Michael remains robust. He tells his mother that he doesn’t need to be caught in the back of a table.

Understanding the South's unequal contribution of military recruits

by Rolando Zenteno / Facing South  - Since the U.S. ended the draft in 1973, young adults from Southern states* have been overrepresented among new military recruits. In fact, the region has been in a league of its own in terms of military recruitment since the late 20th century, with no other region experiencing as wide a disparity in military representation. 

The disproportionate presence of new military recruits from the South can be understood by looking at the region's "representation ratio": its share of new recruits divided by its share of the U.S. young adult population.  A ratio of 1 means a state's share of new recruits is equal to its share of the U.S. young adult population between the ages of 18 and 24, the typical age range for new enlistees. A ratio of less than 1 means a state is providing fewer recruits than might be expected given its young adult population, while a ratio of more than 1 means it's providing more than its fair share.  

Army recruitment today is less "Be all you can be" and more "Call of Duty"

Taylor Allen / Colorado Public Radio -  The main source of light in this dim, warehouse-sized room in suburban Denver comes from rows of screens. Each panel shows fast-paced military action — camouflaged soldiers swarming a city or special operations forces securing a target.

Andrew Garcia, 22, plays 'Call of Duty: Modern Warfare' at the Localhost Denver Arena during an October Army recruiting event. Photo: Taylor Allen, Colorado Public RadioOne of the figures hunched over a computer in the darkness huffs in disappointment.

"I've died like four times in three missions," said 17-year-old Gavin Gains.

Even though he wasn't dominating the brand new "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare" game, Gains attracted the attention of the event's sponsors - the U.S. Army. The office held this release party for the new game at an esports venue called Localhost Arena. Anyone who came to the party was able to play the new game as long as he or she also spoke to Army recruiters.

"This is the targeted demographic - these young men and women that came out here to play the esports," said Sgt. Vincent Cruz, an Army recruiter.

The Army has turned to esports, along with other new marketing strategies, in an attempt to make military service more appealing to young people. Cruz says video games are a way for the Army to connect with more people. It has even created its own professional esports team, which has become part of Cruz's pitch.

Cruz said the military wants to, "Reach out to these men and women and show them that 'Hey, you can actually do this in the Army and get paid by the way.'" The Army calls its esports efforts "some of the highest lead-generating events in the history of the all-volunteer force."

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